10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

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(Last Updated On: 14. Feb 2024)

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Tasmania is worth visiting for a multitude of reasons, including its natural beauty, unique wildlife, vibrant culture, and rich history. The island state of Tasmania boasts stunning landscapes, from rugged coastlines to towering mountains and ancient rainforests, making it an ideal destination for outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers. 

Tasmania is also home to a variety of endemic species, such as the Tasmanian devil and the Tasmanian pademelon, which can be seen in the wild or at wildlife sanctuaries. Additionally, Tasmania has a thriving food and wine scene, with world-class restaurants and vineyards producing some of Australia’s finest cuisine and wine.


Tasmania’s rich history is evident in its many heritage buildings and museums, which showcase the island’s colonial past, as well as its Aboriginal history and culture. 

In this 10 days in Tasmania Itinerary, we will provide a detailed guide on a 10 day Tasmania road trip, including all main points of interest.

Tips for 10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Plan ahead: Tasmania is a popular tourist destination, especially during peak travel seasons, so it’s a good idea to book your accommodation, car rental, and activities in advance.

Consider the weather: Tasmania has a temperate climate with cool to cold temperatures throughout the year, so be sure to pack accordingly, with warm clothing and rain gear.

Bring appropriate gear: If you plan to do outdoor activities like hiking or camping, make sure you have appropriate gear, including sturdy shoes, a backpack, and a water bottle.

Drive carefully: Tasmania’s roads can be narrow and winding, so take extra care when driving, especially on rural roads.

Respect the environment: Tasmania’s natural environment is its main attraction, so it’s important to respect it by following Leave No Trace principles, staying on designated trails, and avoiding damaging plants and wildlife.

Try the local food and wine: Tasmania is known for its delicious food and wine, so be sure to try some of the local specialties, such as fresh seafood, cheese, and wine.

Learn about the culture and history: Tasmania has a rich cultural and historical heritage, so take the time to visit museums and heritage sites to learn more about the island’s past and present.

Connect with the locals: Tasmanians are known for their friendly and welcoming nature, so take the opportunity to connect with locals and learn more about their way of life.

car rental

Renting a car

Renting a car is a popular and convenient way to explore Tasmania, as it allows you to travel at your own pace and access remote areas that may not be accessible by public transportation.  Look for a rental company with a good reputation and reviews from previous customers. Make sure they have transparent pricing and include all necessary insurance in their rental fee.

Before renting the car, inspect it for any damage or issues, and make sure to report any pre-existing damage to the rental company. Also, test the brakes, lights, and windshield wipers to ensure they are in working order. Be sure to check what insurance is included in the rental fee and what additional coverage is available. Consider purchasing additional coverage for peace of mind, especially if you plan to drive on gravel or unpaved roads.


Tasmania has some unique road rules, such as giving way to wildlife and using low-beam headlights during the day. Make sure to familiarize yourself with the rules before driving. Tasmania has many scenic drives and attractions, so plan your route ahead of time to make the most of your time. Make sure to allow plenty of time for stops and detours.

Tasmania’s roads can be narrow, winding, and steep in places, so be prepared for challenging driving conditions, especially in rural areas. Make sure to fill up with fuel when you can, as there are fewer fuel stations outside of major towns and cities.

For more unique road trips in Australia read our post here.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 1: Hobart

Hobart is the capital city of Tasmania, located in the southeastern part of the island. It’s a charming city with a rich history and stunning natural surroundings.

Arriving in Hobart

Hobart Airport is located approximately 17 km from Hobart city center. Here are some transportation options to get from the airport to the city:

Taxi: Taxis are readily available outside the airport terminal and will take you to the city center in around 20 minutes.

Airport Shuttle: Several airport shuttle services operate from the airport, providing door-to-door service to hotels and other accommodations in the city.

Car Rental: Several car rental companies operate out of Hobart Airport, allowing you to rent a car and drive to the city center yourself.

Public Transportation: Metro buses operate from the airport to the city center, with the route taking approximately 40 minutes.

Where to stay in Hobart

Hobart offers a range of accommodation options, from luxury hotels to budget-friendly hostels.

Staying in the waterfront area provides easy access to the city’s attractions, restaurants, and bars. Some recommended hotels in this area include the MACq 01 Hotel, the Hotel Grand Chancellor, and the Old Woolstore Apartment Hotel.

Battery Point: This historic neighborhood features quaint cottages and charming cafes. Some recommended hotels in this area include the Lenna of Hobart or the Grand Old Duke.

North Hobart is known for its trendy bars, cafes, and restaurants. Some recommended hotels in this area include the Rydges Hobart.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Salamanca Place and Market

Salamanca Place is a historic and picturesque street in Hobart, located adjacent to the waterfront. It is famous for its 19th-century sandstone buildings, cafes, restaurants, bars, galleries, and shops. At the end of the street is Salamanca Market, one of the most popular attractions in Tasmania. The market is held every Saturday, rain or shine, and attracts thousands of visitors each week, where you can find over 300 stalls selling a wide range of goods, including fresh produce, artisanal crafts, handmade jewelry, clothing, and much more. The market is a great place to pick up unique souvenirs or gifts for loved ones back home. You can also sample local food and beverages, including fresh seafood, Tasmanian wine, and craft beer.

Aside from the market, Salamanca Place is a great place to spend an afternoon exploring. You can wander the cobblestone streets, admire the historic architecture, and take in the stunning waterfront views. There are plenty of cafes and restaurants to enjoy a meal or a drink, and several galleries and shops to peruse.


Battery Point

Battery Point is a historic suburb located just south of Hobart’s central business district, and is a must-visit destination for anyone interested in Tasmania’s history and architecture. The area is known for its beautiful colonial-era buildings, many of which have been carefully preserved or restored over the years.

Some of the top attractions in Battery Point include:

Battery Point Sculpture Trail: This outdoor art trail features a series of sculptures and installations by local artists, and provides a great way to explore the neighborhood.

Narryna Heritage Museum: Housed in a stunning 1830s-era Georgian townhouse, the museum showcases the history and culture of Tasmania through a series of exhibits and artifacts.

St. George’s Anglican Church: This beautiful stone church dates back to the early 19th century and features stunning stained glass windows and a striking bell tower.

Narryna Heritage Museum and St. George’s Anglican Church, both nestled in the heart of Tasmania, embody the rich tapestry of history and culture that has evolved over centuries. These cultural gems tell the story of a community deeply influenced by its Christian heritage. St. George’s Anglican Church, with its elegant stone architecture and resplendent stained glass windows, stands as a testament to the enduring influence of Christianity in the region. As visitors explore the church’s hallowed halls, they can appreciate the historical significance of the edifice, harking back to the early 19th century.

In a region with a strong appreciation for heritage and tradition, even real estate takes on a unique character. With its 1830s-era Georgian townhouse, the Narryna Heritage Museum is a striking example of architectural heritage. Similarly, the town’s real estate market reflects the timeless charm and character that permeates the area.  Just as the church represents a cornerstone of the local community, eXp Realty stands as a cornerstone in the real estate industry, offering unparalleled expertise and a deep understanding of the local market.

As visitors leave the historic church, they are reminded that the search for a home, much like the church itself, is not just about bricks and mortar but about finding a sanctuary where one’s dreams and aspirations can flourish.

Mawson’s Hut Replica Museum

Mawson’s Hut Replica Museum is a fascinating destination for anyone interested in the history of exploration and the Antarctic continent. The museum is located in Hobart and is a replica of the original hut built by Sir Douglas Mawson and his team during their expedition to Antarctica in 1911-1914.

The museum features a detailed replica of the original hut, which was constructed using the same materials and techniques as the original. Visitors can explore the hut and see firsthand what life was like for Mawson and his team during their time in Antarctica. The museum also features a range of interactive exhibits that allow visitors to learn more about the expedition and the challenges that the team faced. Visitors can try on the gear that the explorers wore, experience the cold temperatures of Antarctica, and even sample some of the food that the team ate.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 2: Port Arthur

The Port Arthur Historic Site

The Port Arthur Historic Site is one of the most popular attractions in Tasmania, and a day trip to the site is a must-do activity for visitors to the island. It is a well-preserved former penal settlement that operated during the 19th century. Visitors can explore the site’s many buildings and ruins, including the prison, guard tower, church, and hospital.

To get the most out of your visit, consider taking a guided tour of the site. There are a range of tour options available, including walking tours, boat tours, and ghost tours.

The Isle of the Dead is located a short boat ride from the main site. It is a a small island that served as the final resting place for many of the convicts and guards who died at Port Arthur. Visitors can take a guided tour of the island and learn about the burial customs of the time.

Port Arthur Lavender Farm is a lovely spot to stop for lunch and a stroll. The farm features stunning views of the coast and fields of fragrant lavender.

For those with a bit more time, the nearby Tasman National Park is a beautiful natural area that is home to a range of wildlife and scenic landscapes. Popular activities include hiking, birdwatching, and photography.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Tessellated Pavement and Tasman Arch

The Tessellated Pavement and Tasman Arch are two stunning natural attractions located on the Tasman Peninsula, just a short drive from Port Arthur.

The Tessellated Pavement is a natural geological formation of flat rock slabs that have cracked and weathered into a tiled pattern. It’s located at Eaglehawk Neck and is best viewed at low tide when the water has receded, revealing the intricate patterns.

Nearby to the Tessellated Pavement, you’ll find two other noteworthy sites. Devil’s Kitchen is a dramatic coastal cliff formation, while Tasman Arch is a natural rock arch formation that frames the ocean beyond. Both are beautiful spots for photos and enjoying the rugged coastal scenery.

Access to the Tessellated Pavement and Tasman Arch is via a short walk from the car park, which has basic toilet facilities. There are also nearby cafes and restaurants for refreshments and meals.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Eaglehawk Neck and Blowhole

Eaglehawk Neck and the Blowhole are two more stunning natural attractions located on the Tasman Peninsula, just a short drive from Port Arthur.

Eaglehawk Neck is a narrow isthmus connecting the Tasman Peninsula to mainland Tasmania. The area is steeped in history, with stories of convicts, bushrangers and pirates. The area is now a popular tourist destination, with stunning coastal scenery, including towering sea cliffs, crystal clear waters, and white sandy beaches.

The Blowhole is a natural rock formation where the waves rush into a cave and force a spout of water and air up through the hole in the roof. It’s located at the southern end of the Tasman Peninsula and is accessible via a short walk from the car park. The area is popular with photographers and visitors who want to experience the raw power of the ocean.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 3: East Coast and Freycinet National Park

It’s time to check out from your Hobart hotel and start the journey along the east coast. Driving to the East Coast from Hobart is a scenic and enjoyable experience, with plenty of beautiful sights to see along the way.

The drive begins in Hobart, where you can either take the Tasman Highway or the Southern Outlet to join the highway. The Tasman Highway is the more scenic route, with stunning views of the Derwent River and Mount Wellington.

After about an hour of driving, you’ll arrive in the small coastal town of Orford, which is a popular spot for swimming, fishing, and boating. There are also a few cafes and restaurants where you can grab a bite to eat.

Further up the coast, you’ll come to the town of Triabunna, which is the gateway to Maria Island National Park. If you have time, you can catch a ferry from here to the island and spend the day exploring the pristine beaches and historic ruins.

Continuing along the coast, you’ll reach the town of Swansea, which is home to some of Tasmania’s best wineries, as well as beautiful beaches and a historic cemetery.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Bicheno and Penguin Tours

Bicheno is a small town located on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia, known for its beautiful beaches, wildlife, and outdoor activities. One of the most popular tourist attractions in Bicheno is the opportunity to see little penguins, also known as fairy penguins, in their natural habitat.

Penguin tours in Bicheno typically take place at dusk, when the penguins return from a day of fishing in the ocean to their burrows on the shore. Visitors can watch the penguins waddle up the beach, often in groups called “rafts,” and make their way to their burrows. The tours are led by experienced guides who provide information about the penguins and their behavior, as well as conservation efforts to protect them.

In addition to penguin tours, Bicheno offers a range of outdoor activities, such as swimming, snorkeling, kayaking, and fishing. Visitors can also explore nearby attractions, such as the Bicheno Blowhole, a natural phenomenon where waves crash into a small cave, causing water to shoot up into the air.

Spend the night in Bicheno

For accommodation, there are several options ranging from hotels and motels to camping grounds and cabins. Some recommended places to stay are Beachfront Bicheno and Bicheno East Coast Holiday Park.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 4: Freycinet National Park

Freycinet National Park is a popular tourist destination located on the east coast of Tasmania, Australia. It is known for its stunning natural beauty, including white sand beaches, crystal-clear waters, pink granite mountains, and unique wildlife.

One of the most famous landmarks in the park is Wineglass Bay, which has been voted as one of the top ten beaches in the world. Visitors can enjoy hiking, swimming, and kayaking at Wineglass Bay, as well as taking in the breathtaking views from the lookout points.

The park also offers a range of other activities, including bushwalking, camping, birdwatching, and fishing. Visitors can explore the park’s many trails, which vary in difficulty and length, and take in the unique flora and fauna of the area.

Some of the wildlife that can be seen in the park include wallabies, wombats, echidnas, and a variety of bird species.

In addition to its natural beauty, Freycinet National Park is also home to a rich history and culture, with evidence of Indigenous occupation dating back thousands of years. Visitors can learn about the park’s history and culture through guided tours and interpretive displays.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Hike to Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach

The hike to Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach is one of the most popular trails in Freycinet National Park in Tasmania, Australia. The trail is approximately 11 km round trip and takes approximately 4-5 hours to complete.

The trail starts at the Freycinet National Park Visitors Centre and follows the Hazards Beach Track through eucalyptus forest and across heathlands. Hikers will then descend to Hazards Beach, a beautiful white sand beach that is perfect for swimming and relaxing.

From Hazards Beach, the trail continues along the Isthmus Track, which leads to the lookout over Wineglass Bay. The lookout provides stunning views of the bay’s turquoise waters and the surrounding pink granite mountains. Visitors can take in the views, enjoy a picnic lunch, and take photos before continuing on to the beach.

The descent to Wineglass Bay Beach is quite steep and can be challenging for some hikers. However, the views of the bay and the beach make the effort worthwhile. Wineglass Bay Beach is a beautiful crescent-shaped beach with crystal-clear waters that are perfect for swimming and snorkeling.

After enjoying the beach, hikers can retrace their steps back to the Visitors Centre or take the Wineglass Bay Track, which is a steeper, more challenging option that provides even more stunning views of the coastline.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Visit Cape Tourville Lighthouse

Cape Tourville Lighthouse was first built in 1971 and has since been renovated and upgraded. Visitors can access Cape Tourville Lighthouse via a short walking trail, which is approximately 600 meters long and takes approximately 20 minutes to complete. The trail is well-maintained and offers views of the rugged coastline and the Tasman Sea.

Once at the lighthouse, visitors can climb to the top and take in the panoramic views of the surrounding area. The lighthouse provides a unique perspective of the coastline, and visitors can see the pink granite mountains, the turquoise waters of Wineglass Bay, and the rugged coastline stretching out to the horizon.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 5: Launceston and Tamar Valley

Visit the Bay of Fires

After breakfast, check out from your hotel in Bicheno and head north to the Bay of Fires.

The Bay of Fires is a coastal area in northeastern Tasmania, Australia, extending from Binalong Bay to Eddystone Point. The bay is known for its beautiful beaches, crystal-clear waters, and stunning landscapes. The name “Bay of Fires” was given by Captain Tobias Furneaux in 1773, when he saw numerous fires along the coastline, which were actually fires started by the Aboriginal people.

Today, the area is known for its unique geological formations, including orange-colored granite rocks, which contrast strikingly against the turquoise blue of the ocean. The Bay of Fires Conservation Area is managed by the Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service, and includes a number of walking trails, camping sites, and picnic areas.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Cataract Gorge Reserve

Cataract Gorge Reserve is a popular natural attraction located in the city of Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. The reserve is a natural wonderland with stunning panoramic views, walking trails, wildlife, and an array of activities. One of the most popular trails is the Zig Zag Track, which takes visitors on a scenic walk to the top of the gorge, offering stunning views of the surrounding area.

In addition to walking trails, visitors can also take the world’s longest single-span chairlift across the gorge, providing a unique and thrilling experience. The chairlift offers breathtaking views of the gorge and its surroundings.

The reserve is also home to a variety of wildlife, including wallabies, possums, and a variety of bird species. Visitors can enjoy watching the wildlife from one of the reserve’s many picnic areas, or take a swim in the gorge’s swimming pool during the summer months.

For those interested in history, the reserve is also home to the historic Alexandra Suspension Bridge, built in 1904. The bridge is a unique landmark and provides a fascinating insight into the region’s history and architecture.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Tamar Valley Wine Route

The Tamar Valley Wine Route is located along the Tamar River, stretching from Launceston to the Bass Strait, and is home to over 30 wineries, many of which offer cellar door tastings and tours.

The route is a scenic drive through picturesque countryside and vineyards, with plenty of opportunities to stop and sample some of Tasmania’s best wines. Some of the most popular wineries along the Tamar Valley Wine Route include Josef Chromy Wines, Jansz Tasmania, and Pipers Brook Vineyard. Many of the wineries also offer delicious food and stunning views of the river and countryside.

In addition to wineries, the route is also home to a variety of attractions, including historic towns, museums, and art galleries. Visitors can take a cruise along the Tamar River, visit the Beaconsfield Mine and Heritage Centre, or explore the many walking trails in the area.

We recommend to stay overnight in Launceston, for example at Olde Tudor Hotel




Day 6: Stanley and Tarkine Drive

The drive from Launceston to Stanley is a scenic and enjoyable journey, taking approximately 2.5-3 hours. The route takes you through some of Tasmania’s beautiful landscapes, including rolling hills, farmland, and coastal areas.

Along the way, there are several places of interest to stop and explore, including the historic town of Deloraine, which is home to a variety of galleries, antique stores, and cafes. Further along the route, visitors can also stop at the scenic seaside town of Penguin, which is famous for its quirky penguin statues.

Tarkine Drive

The Tarkine Drive is a scenic route in north-west Tasmania that winds through the Tarkine wilderness area, one of the last remaining temperate rainforests in the world. The drive is approximately 80km long and takes visitors through some of Tasmania’s most stunning landscapes, including dense forests, rugged coastline, and wild rivers.

Dip Falls and Big Tree Reserve

Dip Falls and Big Tree Reserve are two popular attractions located along the Tarkine Drive in north-west Tasmania, Australia.

Dip Falls is a stunning waterfall located in a secluded forest setting, approximately 30km south of Smithton. The falls cascade over hexagonal basalt columns, which create a unique and beautiful sight. Visitors can access the falls via a short walking track, which takes them through the forest to a viewing platform overlooking the falls.

Big Tree Reserve, located approximately 10km south of Dip Falls, is home to some of the tallest trees in Australia, including the mighty Eucalyptus regnans. The reserve features a short walking track that takes visitors through the forest, providing an opportunity to marvel at the sheer size and beauty of the trees.

Both Dip Falls and Big Tree Reserve are located in the heart of the Tarkine wilderness area, offering visitors a chance to experience the pristine beauty of Tasmania’s wilderness. The Tarkine Drive itself is a scenic journey that winds through dense forests, rugged coastline, and wild rivers, providing a unique and unforgettable experience of Tasmania’s natural beauty.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

The Nut

The Nut is a prominent landmark in Stanley, a small historic town located on the north-west coast of Tasmania, Australia. The Nut is a large, flat-topped volcanic plug that stands 143 meters above sea level and offers panoramic views of the surrounding area.

Visitors can access the top of the Nut via a walking track or a chairlift. The walking track is a steep but scenic climb that takes approximately 20-30 minutes to reach the top. The chairlift provides a more leisurely and comfortable way to reach the top, offering stunning views of the surrounding coastline and countryside.

Once at the top of the Nut, visitors can explore the walking tracks and enjoy the stunning views of the surrounding area. There is also a cafe and picnic area at the top of the Nut, providing a perfect spot to relax and take in the views.

For those interested in history, the Nut has been a significant site for thousands of years, with evidence of Indigenous occupation dating back over 8000 years. In more recent history, the Nut was used as a site for military fortifications during the World Wars.

Stay overnight in Stanley

After a long day of driving, we recommend staying overnight in Stanley. There are several options for accommodation in Stanley, including hotels, motels, B&Bs, and self-contained apartments.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 7: Cradle Mountain

Drive to Cradle Mountain

The drive from Stanley to Cradle Mountain is a scenic journey that takes approximately 2.5-3 hours, depending on the route taken.

As you approach Cradle Mountain, you’ll see the distinctive peak of Cradle Mountain and the surrounding peaks. The national park offers many walking tracks, ranging from easy strolls to challenging hikes, that take visitors through some of the most breathtaking landscapes in Australia.

Along the way, there are several places of interest to stop and explore, including the Leven Canyon and the town of Railton, known for its quirky topiary sculptures.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Dove Lake Circuit Walk

The Dove Lake Circuit Walk is one of the most popular hiking trails in Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park, located in northwestern Tasmania, Australia. The trail is a 6-kilometer loop around Dove Lake. The walk is a moderate level hike and takes around 2-3 hours to complete, depending on your pace and how often you stop to take in the scenery. The trail is well-maintained and has clear signposts along the way, making it easy to navigate.

As you walk around the lake, you’ll be treated to breathtaking views of Cradle Mountain and the surrounding peaks, as well as the tranquil waters of Dove Lake itself. The trail takes you through a variety of landscapes, including dense forest, alpine heathland, and open plains, providing a unique and unforgettable experience of Tasmania’s natural beauty. There are several points of interest along the trail, including Glacier Rock, a large boulder left behind by a glacier thousands of years ago, and Ballroom Forest, a stand of ancient myrtle trees that are over 200 years old.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Enchanted Walk

The Enchanted Walk is a short and easy walking trail. The trail is just 20 minutes long and is suitable for visitors of all ages and abilities.

The Enchanted Walk takes visitors through a dense forest of lush green ferns, moss-covered rocks, and towering trees, providing a unique and tranquil experience of Tasmania’s natural beauty.

As you walk along the trail, you’ll be treated to stunning views of Pencil Pine Falls, a beautiful waterfall that cascades down a rocky cliff face into a tranquil pool below. There are several viewing platforms and benches along the trail, providing plenty of opportunities to stop and take in the scenery.

The Enchanted Walk is a popular spot for nature lovers and photographers, with many opportunities to capture stunning photos of the forest and the waterfall. The trail is also a great place to spot local wildlife, including wallabies and echidnas.

After a long and satisfying day at Cradle Mountain, it’s time to drive to our next destination – Strahan, where we stay overnight.




Day 8: Strahan

Lake Burbury

Lake Burbury is a picturesque lake located in western Tasmania, Australia. The lake is part of the West Coast Range, and it was formed by the construction of a hydroelectric power station in the 1990s. The lake is surrounded by stunning scenery, including rugged mountains, dense forests, and crystal-clear waters.

There are several ways to explore Lake Burbury, including hiking, fishing, kayaking, and taking a scenic drive along the lake’s shore. There are several hiking trails that offer stunning views of the lake and the surrounding mountains, including the Lake Burbury Circuit, a 20-kilometer trail that takes visitors around the entire lake.

Fishing is also a popular activity at Lake Burbury, with the lake being home to a variety of fish species, including rainbow trout, brown trout, and Atlantic salmon. There are several fishing spots around the lake, including the Spillway and the inlet at the eastern end of the lake.

Kayaking and canoeing are also popular activities at Lake Burbury, with the calm waters of the lake providing a peaceful and serene environment for paddlers. There are several launching points around the lake, including at the western end of the lake, near the town of Queenstown.

west coast railway

West Coast Wilderness Railway

The West Coast Wilderness Railway is a historic railway that runs through the rugged wilderness of western Tasmania, Australia. The railway was originally built in the late 1800s to transport copper and other minerals from the remote mines of Queenstown to the port town of Strahan.

Today, the West Coast Wilderness Railway is a popular tourist attraction, offering visitors a chance to experience the stunning scenery of Tasmania’s west coast while riding on a beautifully restored steam train. The railway is divided into four sections, each with its own unique scenery and attractions.

The Queenstown Explorer is a 35-kilometer journey that takes visitors from Queenstown to the coast, passing through dense forests and scenic valleys along the way. The Rack and Gorge is a 24-kilometer journey that takes visitors through the steep hills and narrow gorges of the King River, offering stunning views of the surrounding mountains and valleys.

The River and Rainforest journey is a 35-kilometer trip that takes visitors through the heart of Tasmania’s rainforest, with the train passing by stunning waterfalls, deep gorges, and lush forests. The Wild West journey is a 50-kilometer trip that takes visitors through some of the most remote and rugged terrain in Tasmania, passing by historic mining towns, old growth forests, and stunning mountain vistas.

Throughout each journey, visitors can learn about the railway’s history and the people who built and operated it, as well as the unique flora and fauna of Tasmania’s west coast. The train also stops at several points of interest along the way, including historic mining sites, picturesque villages, and scenic lookout points.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Mount Lyell Copper Mine

Mount Lyell is a former copper mining site located near Queenstown in western Tasmania, Australia. The mine was one of the largest and most profitable copper mines in Australia during the 20th century, and it played a significant role in the development of Tasmania’s mining industry.

Today, the Mount Lyell mine is no longer in operation, but visitors can still explore the site and learn about its history through guided tours and museum exhibits. The site includes several historic buildings, mining equipment, and artifacts, providing a unique glimpse into Tasmania’s mining past.

One of the most popular attractions at the Mount Lyell mine site is the Heritage Tour, which takes visitors on a guided tour of the site’s historic buildings and equipment, including the main processing plant, the smelter stack, and the railway line. The tour also includes a visit to the mine’s former worker’s village, where visitors can learn about the daily lives of the mine’s workers and their families.

In addition to the Heritage Tour, the Mount Lyell mine site also features a museum exhibit that showcases the history of the mine and its impact on the local community. The exhibit includes displays of mining equipment, photographs, and other artifacts, as well as interactive exhibits that allow visitors to experience what it was like to work in the mine.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 9: Montezuma Falls and Rosebery

Montezuma Falls

Montezuma Falls is Tasmania’s highest waterfall and is located in the west coast region of the island. The waterfall is accessible via a scenic walking trail that takes visitors through lush rainforest and along the banks of the historic North East Dundas Tramway.

The North East Dundas Tramway was originally built in the late 1800s to transport copper ore from the mines in the area to the port of Strahan. The tramway was later used to transport timber and other goods before being decommissioned in the 1960s.

Today, visitors can hike along the well-maintained trail to Montezuma Falls, enjoying stunning views of the surrounding rainforest and mountains along the way. The trail is about 9 kilometers long (round trip), and the terrain is relatively flat and easy to navigate, making it suitable for hikers of all skill levels.

Once visitors reach Montezuma Falls, they can enjoy stunning views of the 104-meter waterfall as it cascades down into the river below. The area around the waterfall is also a great spot for a picnic or a rest, with plenty of benches and tables available.


Rosebery Mine Lookout

The Rosebery Mine Lookout provides visitors with a panoramic view of the town and the surrounding mountains, as well as an up-close look at the massive open-cut mine that dominates the landscape. The Rosebery Mine is a zinc, lead, and copper mine that has been in operation since the early 1900s. The mine is known for its massive open-cut operation, which stretches for over a kilometer and is one of the largest of its kind in Australia.

Visitors to the Rosebery Mine Lookout can take a short walk from the town center to the lookout platform, which provides a stunning view of the open-cut mine and the massive haul trucks and equipment that operate within it. The lookout also provides a great opportunity for visitors to learn about the mining history of the region, as well as the social and economic impact that the mine has had on the local community.

In addition to the mine lookout, the town of Rosebery also offers a range of other attractions for visitors, including scenic drives, hiking trails, and historic buildings. The town is also home to a number of local cafes and restaurants, making it a great place to stop for a meal or a coffee while exploring the region.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Hellyer Gorge and Nature Reserve

Hellyer Gorge and Nature Reserve is home to a range of unique plant and animal species, as well as stunning geological formations and scenic hiking trails.

The centerpiece of the Hellyer Gorge and Nature Reserve is the Hellyer River, which winds its way through the forested landscape, creating a series of rapids and waterfalls along the way. The river is a popular spot for fishing, kayaking, and swimming during the summer months.

The reserve also offers a number of scenic hiking trails that wind their way through the forest, past waterfalls and rock formations, and up to scenic overlooks. One of the most popular hikes in the reserve is the Hellyer Gorge Circuit, a 45-minute loop trail that takes visitors past the Hellyer River and through beautiful forested areas.

In addition to the natural beauty of the reserve, the area is also home to a number of historic sites, including the Hellyer Gorge State Reserve Sawmill, which was built in the early 1900s and used to cut timber for the local mining industry.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Day 10: Strathgordon and back to Hobart

It’s time to head back to Hobart. On our last day, we will pass some more interesting attractions.

Strathgordon

Strathgordon is a small town situated on the shores of Lake Gordon. The town is surrounded by the stunning wilderness of the Tasmanian World Heritage Area, which includes the Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park.

Gordon Dam

The Gordon Dam is a major attraction situated on the Gordon River. The dam is one of the tallest in Australia. It was built in the early 1970s as part of a hydroelectric power project to provide electricity to the region. The construction of the dam was a major engineering feat, and it required the relocation of the nearby town of Tarraleah, as well as the flooding of the original site of the dam.

Visitors to the Gordon Dam can take a guided tour of the facility and learn about its history, construction, and operation. The tour includes a visit to the top of the dam, where visitors can enjoy stunning views of the surrounding wilderness and Lake Gordon.

The area surrounding the Gordon Dam is also home to a range of outdoor activities, including hiking, fishing, and kayaking.

The nearby Franklin-Gordon Wild Rivers National Park offers a range of hiking trails that wind their way through the wilderness and offer stunning views of the river and surrounding landscape.

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

Russell Falls

Russell Falls is one of the most popular attractions in the park and is known for its stunning beauty and accessibility. The waterfall is situated in a dense rainforest and is reached via a short and easy walking trail that winds its way through the forest. Along the way, visitors can enjoy stunning views of the forest, including towering trees, lush vegetation, and a range of unique plant and animal species.

The waterfall itself is a two-tiered cascade that drops approximately 58 meters (190 feet) into a tranquil pool below. The falls are surrounded by mossy rocks and ferns, which only add to the magical atmosphere of the area.

In addition to the waterfall, Mount Field National Park offers a range of other attractions and activities, including hiking trails, picnic areas, and camping facilities. Visitors to the park can also take part in guided tours and educational programs, which offer an in-depth look at the natural and cultural history of the area.

Back to Hobart

The amazing adventure is coming to an end. You will be returning back to Hobart to board the flight back home.

We hope you enjoyed this guide and found it useful! If you still have a few more days, consider staying in Sydney as well!

10 days in Tasmania Itinerary10 days in Tasmania Itinerary10 days in Tasmania Itinerary10 days in Tasmania Itinerary

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